Author Archives: David Bedford

About David Bedford

I grew up in the Dingle near the street where Ringo Starr was born, and went to the same school as Ringo - though 25 years later! I now live by Penny Lane and in 2009 published my first book on The Beatles: "Liddypool". After that success, my follow-up book was published at the end of 2013, "The one hundred and Four", which traces the musical evolution of The Beatles.

The Beatles at the Barnston Women’s Institute

On 25th September 1962, The Beatles returned to my favourite venue; the Barnston Womens Institute on the Wirral. They first appeared at this tiny venue in March with Pete Best in their new suits, and now they were back this time with Ringo. Its a small hall attached to a farm, and you could only get between 80-100 people in there! Rock n roll!! #beatles #liddypool

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Happy birthday Brian Epstein

On 19th September 1934, Brian Epstein was born in Liverpool. Without him, The Beatles would not have made it out of Liverpool and yet he still doesn’t get the credit he deserves. Celebrate the Fifth Beatle, Brian Epstein, today and every day.

In our new book, Finding the Fourth Beatle, read our interview with David Roberts, Brian’s lawyer, who helped us understand the man who became the Bealtes manager, and why he was a man of his word.

http://www.thefourthbeatle.com

#brianepstein #fifthbeatle #beatles #fourthbeatle @fifthbeatle @fourthbeatle

Andy White – Love Me Do

What an interesting day 11th September 1962 was for The Beatles. Not satisfied with Ringo’s drumming the previous week, George Martin did what he told Brian Epstein back in June. He was going to use a session drummer on their first record. Ringo walked into the studio and was shocked to see another drummer setting up. It was Andy White. Read my interview with Andy about his recollection of the session, and also why Ringo thought they were “doing a Pete Best on me.”

Ringo was also confused as to which record he was on – the single or the LP. We compare the two versions released, with both Ringo and Andy White’s drumming analysed by drummers and experts. Ringo didn’t forgive George Martin for years – if at all. For Ringo, he wouldn’t be needing session drummers to replace him once he established himself as the Fourth Beatle.

Andy White is one of our 23 drummers in Finding the Fourth Beatle

https://www.thefourthbeatle.com

#ringo #ringostarr #beatles #beatle #fourthbeatle

Irby Village Hall

In this little hall on 7th September 1962, in between The Beatles two EMI sessions, John, Paul, George and Ringo played here at Irby Village Hall on the Wirral. Although the hall was packed, they hadn’t raised enough money to pay Brian Epstein, who had to return for the balance of the money. George Harrison also left a suitcase behind, full of guitar strings and those bits and bobs of electrical gear, which he never collected. How quickly their world changed from here. 15 months later, they were appearing before over 70 million Americans on the Ed Sullivan Show. They earned their succ

Irby Village Hall

ess. Irby Village Hall is one of over 100 local venues featured in Liddypool, my first book. #beatles

4th September 1962 EMI

4th September 1962 was an interesting day for The Beatles, and shrouded in confusion too. Ringo had joined just a couple of weeks before, and they found themselves at Abbey Road. Was this a recording session? A catch-up? Why was there no session drummer? From alleged phone calls to the confusion over which version of “Love Me Do” was later released (Ringo was convinced he didn’t play on the single), we pick our way through the mists of time and clarify what really happened that day, in Finding the Fourth Beatle. It’s about more than just the 23 drummers!

Find out more at http://www.thefourthbeatle.com

John, Paul, George and Mahapurush

John, Paul, George and Mahapurush? Sound familiar?

Well, it happened, and the full story is in “Finding the Fourth Beatle” – not long now to reserve your limited edition copy of the new book that is rewriting Beatles history. Mahapurush is only 1 of the 22 drummers featured in the book. Can you count 22 drummers? If not, you need this book!

Finding the Fourth Beatle

“There Goes The Knighthood!” said Ringo Starr

When Ringo recorded “Elizabeth Reigns” on his Ringo Rama album (2003), he signed off by saying; “there goes the knighthood”.  Some of his lyrics were not overly complimentary to her majesty, like:

We don’t really need a king.

Six hundred servants

Use her detergent

Scrubbing the palace floor

 

And all of your sins are

As big as the Windsors

So let’s point our fingers

No more.”

Has that delayed his knighthood? Does he even deserve one?

Many have questioned: “why has he got it?” or “just because he was a Beatle?”. “Is this just further degrading the honour system?”

So what has Ringo done to deserve it? Many people, including Beatles fans, don’t give Ringo the credit for his part in The Beatles’ success. Was he just a lucky guy who jumped on the bandwagon, or something more?

FLAT_Fourth-Beatle_GBF_SkellettIn our new book, “Finding the Fourth Beatle”, we examine how and why Ringo became the drummer in the Fab Four, the only drummer to have lasted the distance with John, Paul and George. From 1956-1970, we detail the 18 drummers who played a part in their success, and ultimately why Ringo became the right drummer at the right time. He wasn’t the first drummer asked to replace Pete Best, but he proved to be a wise choice.

But we aren’t just saying it without backing it up with evidence. We have enlisted the help of several drummers who explain what it was that made Ringo such a unique drummer, by analysing his style and his experience of playing skiffle, country, jazz, and to the audiences in summer camps at Butlins. We have had a number of Beatles songs analysed, and show his contribution, what difference he did make to those songs, and the evolution of The Beatles’ sound. He wasn’t just a spare part sat at the back of the band, but integral to their development as a group, who has gone on to be recognised as one of the most influential drummers of all time. Not bad for a boy from the Dingle!

But that, in itself, isn’t enough to warrant a knighthood. What else has he done? His well-known problems with alcohol led him, and his second wife Barbara Bach, to check in to rehab to battle alcoholism. Ringo emerged as a new man, and together with Barbara, the two established the Lotus Foundation:

“The objectives of the Lotus Foundation are to fund, support, participate in and promote charitable projects aimed at advancing social welfare in diverse areas including, but not limited to:

  • Substance abuse
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Brain tumours
  • Cancer
  • Battered women and their children
  • Homelessness
  • Animals in need”

Over the years, he has raised millions of pounds for his charity through books, performances, and most recently by selling off property and memorabilia he no longer needs/ uses. Through his high-profile status as a former Beatle, and successful solo artist, he has made a difference to countless lives around the world, much of which goes on unnoticed.

You don’t get a knighthood for being a Beatle: you do for making a difference and promoting Peace and Love.

Arise, Sir Fourth Beatle Ringo (and don’t mention “Elizabeth Reigns”!)

David Bedford

Pre-order “Finding the Fourth Beatle” now